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Gov. Parson Signs Proclamation to End Elective Abortions in Missouri

The following is a release from the Office of Governor Parson

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Friday, in response to the United States Supreme Court’s ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, Governor Mike Parson signed a proclamation giving legal effect to Section 188.017 RSMo and activating the “Right to Life of the Unborn Child Act.”

“Nothing in the text, history, or tradition of the United States Constitution gave un-elected federal judges authority to regulate abortion. We are happy that the U.S. Supreme Court has corrected this error and returned power to the people and the states to make these decisions,” Governor Parson said.

“With Roe v. Wade overturned and statutory triggers provided in HB 126, we are issuing this proclamation to restore our state authority to regulate abortion and protect life. Thanks to decades of conservative leaders, Missouri has become one of the most pro-life states in the nation, and our Administration has always fought for the life of every unborn child. Today, our efforts have produced what generations of Missourians have worked and prayed for: Today, we have won our fight to protect innocent life,” Governor Parson continued.

Governor Parson’s proclamation notifies the Missouri Revisor of Statutes of the effective date of Section 188.017 RSMo.

Section 188.017, or the “Right to Life of the Unborn Child Act,” includes several provisions:

  • Prohibits doctors from performing abortions unless there is a medical emergency;
  • Creates criminal liability for any person who knowingly performs or induces a non-medical emergency abortion and subjects his or her professional license to suspension; and
  • Protects any woman who receives an illegal abortion from being prosecuted in violation of the Act. 

The “Right to Life of the Unborn Child Act” was included in HB 126 and contingent upon the U.S. Supreme Court overruling Roe v. Wade in whole or in part. Governor Parson signed HB 126 in 2019. 

Governor Parson’s Administration is coordinating with the Missouri Attorney General to quickly resolve any litigation against HB 126 before the Courts that is currently preventing implementation of the law.

See attachment for the proclamation that has been signed by Governor Parson and sent to the Secretary of State’s Office to be attested. 

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Area lawmakers react to overturning of Roe V. Wade

KSNF/KODE — Friday, The Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, which ultimately gives states the choice to limit or outright ban abortion procedures.

Many states in the South or Midwest are now expected to go through with their own legislation to restrict abortion access. Some of these states have trigger laws to take effect following the Supreme Court’s decision. In the Four States, these include: Missouri, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

Read responses from area lawmakers on the recent ruling below:

Missouri

Nothing in the text, history, or tradition of the United States Constitution gave un-elected federal judges authority to regulate abortion. We are happy that the U.S. Supreme Court has corrected this error and returned power to the people and the states to make these decisions.

MO Gov. Mike Parson – Press Release

At long last, Roe is OVERRULED

This is a momentous day in America, when the efforts of generations of modern-day abolitionists comes to fruition. One of the most unjust decisions in American history has been overturned.

U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley – Twitter

Roe v Wade has been overruled!

MO Rep. Ben Baker – Twitter

I’ve waited 49 years for it and the wait is OVER!!! #SCOTUS overturns #RoeVsWade, potentially saving millions of innocent lives!!!

MO Rep. Billy Long – Twitter

The pro-life movement has been fighting for every minute of the nearly five decades since Roe was issued for it to be reversed. I am deeply thankful to see their labors come to fruition and I am proud to once again live in a nation which upholds the sanctity of life.

MO Rep. Vicky Hartzler – Twitter

Kansas

Today’s historic decision on the Dobbs case signals a new beginning for millions of unborn American children. Thank you #SCOTUS!

U.S. Sen. Roger Marshall – Twitter

Today, nearly 50 years after Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court ruled there is no constitutional right to abortion. As stated by Justice Alito, “It is time to heed the Constitution and return the issue of abortion to the people’s elected representatives.”

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran – Twitter

Today is a monumental win for pro-life Americans across our country who have been fighting tirelessly over the last fifty years to protect the most vulnerable among us—the unborn. Full statement available through Twitter link.

KS Rep. Jake LaTurner – Twitter

Oklahoma

I am very excited that the Supreme Court made this courageous decision. Abortion is a state’s right issue and it belongs to the people. Full statement available through Twitter link.

OK Gov. Kevin Stitt – Twitter

The Court has now rightfully declared that Roe was wrong from the start, &we can begin to chart a new course on the journey to protect life. During my time in Congress, I have fought to give a voice to the voiceless & will continue the fight during the remainder of my tenure.

U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe – Twitter

Today is a great day for our nation—as Roe v. Wade has been overturned! “The constitution does not confer a right to abortion. Roe and Casey are overruled and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives

U.S. Sen. James Lankford – Twitter

I am proud to support life at every stage and applaud the Supreme Court for their thoughtful and attentive consideration of this important case in the face of unprecedented threats of violence and intimidation against the Court. Full statement available through Twitter link.

OK Rep. Kevin Hern – Twitter

The Scales of Justice have weighed in favor of LIFE. Full statement available through Twitter link.

OK Rep. Markwayne Mullin – Twitter

Arkansas

For decades I have said Roe v. Wade was wrongly decided. Today, the Supreme Court overturned the abortion ruling and returned the issue to the states. Arkansas is a pro-life state, and we are able now to protect life.

AR Gov. Asa Hutchinson – Twitter

Roe was a tragic mistake, taking from the American people and their elected representatives a deeply moral question. The Supreme Court has finally corrected this mistake and I highly commend the millions of Americans who toiled for years to achieve this great victor for unborn life and self-government.

U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton – Twitter

With this ruling, the American people will finally have the opportunity to enact their will on this issue instead of unelected judges in Washington, D.C. Full statement available through Twitter link.

U.S. Sen. John Boozman – Twitter

Life wins! The dignity and value of each human life has been upheld. This decision rightfully restores the American people’s ability to protect babies and recognizes the science-backed truths of the humanity of the unborn. Full statement available through Twitter link.

AR Rep. Steve Womack – Twitter

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AG Schmitt ends abortion in Missouri following SCOTUS ruling

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt signed a proclamation Friday banning abortion following the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade at about 9 a.m.

Missouri has a “trigger law,” meaning abortion would be abolished with a proclamation from the governor or AG following Roe v. Wade overturning.

Missouri is the first in the country to end abortion. Schmitt signed the proclamation at about 9:15 a.m.

The decision made by the Supreme Court Friday to fundamentally reshape American society by overturning the landmark 1973 precedent is certain to ignite a political firestorm and yield a complex patchwork of state laws that will effectively block large swathes of the population from terminating unwanted pregnancies.

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Roe v. Wade Overturned: 4-State officials react and a look at trigger laws

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access.

The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted. Here is an overview of abortion legislation and the expected impact of the court’s decision in the 4-States.

KOAM is speaking with residents in the 4-States today. Watch KOAM News for the latest. (Ways to Watch digitally)

>> Related: How U.S. states have banned, limited or protected abortion

>> President Biden reacts. Watch it below, or click here.

Missouri

A Missouri law outlawing most abortions took effect Friday, as Republican state officials acted quickly to enforce a ban following a U.S. Supreme Court decision ending constitutional protections for abortion. However, Governor Parson’s Administration is coordinating with the Missouri Attorney General to quickly resolve any litigation against HB 126, including the “Right to Life of the Unborn Child Act”, before the Courts that is currently preventing the implementation of the law.

Political control: Both GOP Gov. Mike Parson and the Republican-led Legislature support laws against abortion.

Effect of Supreme Court ruling: The 2019 abortion ban kicks in because the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. Moments after Friday’s Supreme Court decision overturning that precedent, Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt and Gov. Mike Parson filed the necessary paperwork to immediately enact the state’s abortion ban.

Missouri bans most abortions after US Supreme Court ruling

What’s next: Many Missouri patients seeking abortions likely will travel to neighboring states, including Illinois and Kansas (which could change after August’s election). A new Illinois logistics center near St. Louis helps women from out of state find travel, lodging and childcare if they need help getting to the area for an abortion, and it connects them with funding sources.

Missouri Governor Mike Parson Signs a Proclamation

“Nothing in the text, history, or tradition of the United States Constitution gave un-elected federal judges authority to regulate abortion. We are happy that the U.S. Supreme Court has corrected this error and returned power to the people and the states to make these decisions,” Missouri Governor Parson said.

“With Roe v. Wade overturned and statutory triggers provided in HB 126, we are issuing this proclamation to restore our state authority to regulate abortion and protect life. Thanks to decades of conservative leaders, Missouri has become one of the most pro-life states in the nation, and our Administration has always fought for the life of every unborn child. Today, our efforts have produced what generations of Missourians have worked and prayed for: Today, we have won our fight to protect innocent life,” Governor Parson continued.

Governor Parson’s proclamation notifies the Missouri Revisor of Statutes of the effective date of Section 188.017 RSMo.

Section 188.017, or the “Right to Life of the Unborn Child Act,” includes several provisions:

  • Prohibits doctors from performing abortions unless there is a medical emergency;
  • Creates criminal liability for any person who knowingly performs or induces a non-medical emergency abortion and subjects his or her professional license to suspension; and
  • Protects any woman who receives an illegal abortion from being prosecuted in violation of the Act.

The “Right to Life of the Unborn Child Act” was included in HB 126 and contingent upon the U.S. Supreme Court overruling Roe v. Wade in whole or in part. Governor Parson signed HB 126 in 2019.

Governor Parson’s Administration is coordinating with the Missouri Attorney General to quickly resolve any litigation against HB 126 before the Courts that is currently preventing the implementation of the law.

Officials Release Statements after Roe v. Wade decision

The Missouri House Democratic Campaign Committee and the Missouri Democratic Party released the following joint statement:

“Today will be a day branded into the memories of millions of Missourians as the day we lost not only our right to privacy, but our bodily autonomy.

Missourians know what’s best for them and their families, and today that has been stripped away from them. Today, the Supreme Court has ruled that Republicans can steal the right of survivors of rape and incest to determine what is best for them.

Republicans will not stop with abortion. They will continue to strip away access to birth control and contraception, in vitro fertilization, and same-sex marriage. Just this past session, Missouri Republicans proposed bills criminalizing the treatment of ectopic pregnancies and crossing state lines to have an abortion in a state where the right to privacy and bodily autonomy is respected.

The Missouri Democratic Party and the Missouri House Democratic Campaign Committee believe the decision if and when to start a family is a serious and personal decision, not one that any politician should be a barrier to.

We stand with the millions of Missourians who believe in the right to abortion and against government intrusion.”

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt today issued an opinion to the Missouri Revisor of Statutes that “triggers” parts of Missouri’s House Bill 126, effectively ending abortion in the State of Missouri. Missouri is the first state in the country to do so.

“Today, following the United States Supreme Court’s ruling that overturned Roe v. Wade, with the issuance of an attorney general opinion, my Office has yet again reinforced Missouri’s dedication to protecting the sanctity of life, both born and unborn. With this attorney general opinion, my Office has effectively ended abortion in Missouri, becoming the first state in the country to do so following the Court’s ruling,” said Attorney General Schmitt. “My Office has been fighting to uphold the sanctity of life since I became attorney general, culminating in today’s momentous court ruling and attorney general opinion. I will continue the fight to protect all life, born and unborn.”

Section B of HB126 states, “The enactment of section 188.017 of this act shall only become effective upon notification to the revisor of statutes by an opinion by the attorney general of Missouri…”

And Section 188.017 that is “triggered” by an attorney general’s opinion states, in part, “Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, no abortion shall be performed or induced upon a woman, except in cases of medical emergency…”

Thus, with the opinion from the Missouri Attorney General’s Office, abortion, except in cases of medical emergency, is now outlawed in the State of Missouri.

The opinion states, “By issuing this Attorney General Opinion No. 22-2022 and providing it directly to you, I hereby provide notification to the Revisor of Statutes, pursuant to § 188.017.4(1), that the United States Supreme Court has overruled, in whole or in part, Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), restoring or granting to the state of Missouri the authority to regulate abortion to the extent set forth in § 188.017, RSMo, and that as a result, it is reasonably probable that § 188.017 would be upheld by the court as constitutional.”

The full opinion can be found here.

Washington D.C.- Congressman Billy Long issued the following statement after the United States Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

“Today, the Supreme Court made the right decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health,” Congressman Long said. “Six justices correctly overturned one of the worst decisions in Supreme Court history. Roe v. Wade has no basis in Constitutional law, and forced the states to accept the barbaric practice of abortion. I’ve never understand how a civilized society could possibly condone the killing of an innocent child in their mother’s womb. This is simply unconscionable to me and was for 49 years.

I am thrilled the State of Missouri has now outlawed all abortions in the state, in accordance with our “Trigger Law” to ban abortion immediately after Roe was overturned. Now I hope that we never look back.”

Oklahoma

Abortion services were halted in Oklahoma in May after Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill that prohibits all abortions with few exceptions. However, abortion laws are being challenged in lower courts in the state.

Political control: Republicans in Oklahoma have a supermajority in both chambers of the Legislature and a Republican governor up for reelection this year who has vowed to sign “every pro-life legislation that came across my desk.”

Background: Abortion services were halted in Oklahoma in May after Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill that prohibits all abortions with few exceptions. The ban is enforced by civil lawsuits rather than criminal prosecution. Republican lawmakers have been pushing to restrict abortion in the state for decades, passing 81 different restrictions since Roe v. Wade was decided in 1973, according to the Guttmacher Institute.

Effect of Supreme Court ruling: The U.S. Supreme Court has little practical effect given that abortions are no longer being provided in Oklahoma. However, because several Oklahoma abortion laws still are facing legal challenges in lower courts, it’s possible that the abortion bans in place could be temporarily lifted. Oklahoma also has a “trigger law” that outlaws abortion immediately with the overturning of Roe.

What’s next: Given the fierce opposition to abortion from the governor and Legislature, Oklahoma will continue to prohibit the practice if states are given the option to do so. Meanwhile, abortion providers who had been operating in the state are taking steps to help patients seek abortions out of state, including coordinating funding for these women and developing a referral network of therapists to help address complications before or after a woman receives an abortion.

Officials Release Statements after Roe v. Wade decision

Oklahoma Attorney General O’Connor released the following.

“After almost 50 years, the U.S. Supreme Court has wiped one of the most horrifying opinions in American history from the books.  It has courageously done so in the face of intimidation, leaks, violence, and even an assassination attempt,” Attorney General O’Connor stated. “Roe not only took away over 60 million lives, it also barred Oklahomans and all other Americans from protecting our unborn children. We should help every woman facing a crisis pregnancy, but not at the cost of the innocent child’s life. This is truly a day for celebration and thanksgiving.”

Governor Kevin Stitt released the following statement after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade:

“I am very excited that the Supreme Court made this courageous decision. Abortion is a state’s rights issue and it belongs to the people. I promised Oklahomans I would sign every pro-life bill that came across my desk and I am proud to have kept that promise, especially today as Oklahoma now has trigger laws to ban abortion in our state. I am proud to be called America’s most pro-life governor and I’m looking forward to the rest of the country following Oklahoma’s lead to protect life.”

Kansas

Voters will decide on August 2nd whether the state constitution protects the right to an abortion. 

Political control: Kansas has a legislature controlled by Republicans who want to ban or restrict access to abortions but a Democratic governor who supports access and is up for re-election this year.

Background: Under current law, Kansas does not ban most abortions until the 22nd week of pregnancy, when they’re allowed only to save a patient’s life or to prevent “a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.” The state Supreme Court in 2019 declared that access to abortion is a “fundamental” right under the state constitution, granting stronger protections to abortion rights than the U.S. Constitution does currently. State law, however, doesn’t allow providers to dispense abortion medications through telemedicine consultations.

Effect of Supreme Court ruling: The U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade doesn’t change anything immediately in Kansas. The state Supreme Court blocked enforcement of a 2015 legislative ban on a common second-trimester procedure, and abortion opponents fear a host of other rules could fall to legal challenges in the near future. The GOP-controlled Legislature responded by putting a constitutional amendment on the ballot during the Aug. 2 primary. The amendment would declare that the state constitution does not grant a right to abortion. It would allow lawmakers to restrict abortion as much as the federal courts will allow — and to ban it if Roe is overturned.

What’s next: If voters approve the amendment, the Legislature would still have to approve the new restrictions, and lawmakers are out of session until January 2023. They can call themselves into special session with two-thirds majorities, but they’re likely to wait until after voters decide in the November general election whether to give Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly a second term.

Officials Release Statements after Roe v. Wade decision

U.S. Senator Roger Marshall, M.D. released a video statement addressing this historic decision. Senator Marshall said, in part,

“As an OBGYN, I had the honor of delivering more than 5,000 babies. Because of these wonderful moments and experiences, I believe life begins at conception. In fact, this is why today’s historic decision signals a new beginning for millions of unborn American children…Hopefully, today begins healing the wounds the pro-abortion agenda ripped open on American society almost 50 years ago… I want to remind everyone that putting an end to Roe vs Wade simply places this emotion-filled issue into the hands of the citizens of this country and their elected state officials, as opposed to unelected members of the federal judiciary… While the Democrat Majority Leader called for violence during a pro-abortion rally speech on the steps of the Supreme Court, we as a nation are better than this.  I urge all Americans to remain peaceful and respectful during the protests of this decision… Justice cannot and will not be served under the threat of mob violence so help us God.”
You may click HERE or on the image below to watch Senator Marshall’s full video statement.

AG Derek Schmidt statement on U.S. Supreme Court decision in abortion case

“Today’s landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court was the right one because as a matter of constitutional interpretation, as the Court writes, ‘Roe was egregiously wrong from the start.’ Now, the Court explains, ‘The permissibility of abortion, and the limitations upon it, are to be resolved like most important questions in our democracy: by citizens trying to persuade one another and then voting.’

“Today’s decision means the power and responsibility to decide the important and difficult questions involving regulation of abortion have been returned to the people instead of federal judges. The people of Kansas will speak directly to this subject in less than six weeks. In voting on the Value Them Both amendment, Kansans will decide whether state judges may determine how abortion is regulated in Kansas or whether that is a responsibility for the elected and democratically accountable branches of state government.

“In my view, the increase in the number of abortions in Kansas the past two years after a long period of steady decline is distressing. I prefer a future with less abortion, not more. To preserve existing limits on late-term abortions, requirements parents be notified when minors seek abortion, and prohibitions on using taxpayer funds to pay for abortion, I will join with other pro-life Kansans in casting my vote for Value Them Both. On August 2, the people will speak and their voice will show the path forward for Kansas.”

Arkansas

Arkansas bans abortion under a “trigger law” following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.

Political control: Arkansas’ legislature is controlled by Republicans who have supported dozens of abortion bans and restrictions in recent years. Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson also has supported bans on abortion with some exceptions. He’s term-limited and leaves office in January. Republican nominee Sarah Sanders, press secretary to former President Donald Trump, is widely favored in the November election to succeed him.

Background: Arkansas law currently bans most abortions 20 weeks into a woman’s pregnancy, with exceptions for rape, incest and the life of the mother. The state has several other bans that have been struck down or blocked by the courts in recent years, including an outright abortion ban enacted last year that doesn’t include rape or incest exceptions. That ban has been blocked by a federal judge, and the state has appealed the ruling.

Effect of Supreme Court ruling: If the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, the state would ban abortion under a “trigger law” it enacted in 2019 that conditions a ban on such a ruling. That ban, along with the outright ban that’s been blocked by a federal judge in the state, only allows exceptions to protect the life of the mother in a medical emergency. Hutchinson has said he thinks bans should include rape and incest exceptions, but he has not called on the Legislature to add those to either of the bans.

What’s next: Arkansas’ “trigger” law banning nearly all abortions in the state takes effect if the attorney general certifies that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. The only exception in that ban is to protect the life of the mother in a medical emergency. The Legislature isn’t scheduled to meet until January, but Hutchinson is considering calling a special session to take up tax relief proposals. The Republican governor has not said he plans to include any legislation related to abortion on the agenda for that session.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson

“For decades I have said Roe v. Wade was wrongly decided. Today, the Supreme Court overturned the abortion ruling and returned the issue to the states. Arkansas is a pro-life state, and we are able now to protect life.” – Twitter

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Watch Live: Jan. 6 hearings resume Tuesday

WASHINGTON (NewsNation) — The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol is set to hear from elections workers and local officials who warded off former President Donald Trump’s pressure to overturn the 2020 presidential election.

This is the fourth televised public hearing investigating the insurrection at the Capitol. The hearing is expected to focus on Trump’s efforts to undo now-President Joe Biden’s victory by leaning on officials in key battleground states to reject ballots outright or to submit alternative electors for the final tally in Congress. 

Embattled Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger is scheduled to testify about Trump’s phone call asking him to “find 11,780” votes that could flip the state to prevent Biden’s election victory.

Raffensperger, with his deputy Gabe Sterling and Arizona’s Republican state House Speaker Rusty Bowers, are scheduled to be key witnesses, along with Wandrea “Shay” Moss, a former Georgia election worker who, with her mother, have said they faced such severe public harassment from Trump allies they felt unable to live normal lives.

NewsNation will live stream the hearings at 1 pm ET. You can watch the hearing live in the player above.

For prior coverage of previous hearings, click here

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Officials say political sign theft is a growing problem in Pittsburg

PITTSBURG, Kan. – During elections, political sign theft is a growing problem in Pittsburg Kansas.

This year, a constitutional amendment known as “value them both” will be on the ballot during the primary election in August of 2022.

“If you’re going to steal a sign or deface it. And if you’re looking at theft or criminal charges, you’re going to get a court date just like you would anything else. You know, you have to appear in court,” said Crawford County Sherrif Danny Smith. “Between the county attorney and the judges, they’re going to decide at some point in time if you’re going to get a fine or what goes along with the consequences of doing that, and it’s really up to them how they decide to do that.”

The CCSO encourages residents not to disturb others’ property of any kind, as consequences are likely.

 

 

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EXPLAINER: How a U.S. gun safety deal could impact Kansas

TOPEKA, (KSNT) — Lawmakers in the U.S. Senate reached a bipartisan agreement on gun safety legislation over the weekend.

The current framework for the plan includes billions of dollars being set aside for school safety improvements and mental health services. It also aims to provide stronger background checks for people under 21, and offers money to states implementing red-flag laws.

Kansas U.S. Senator Roger Marshall, introduced his gun legislation to provide money for safer schools last week. On Monday, Marshall sent Kansas Capitol Bureau a statement on the latest negotiations in the Senate.

I support commonsense measures to keep our kids safe in school, which is why I introduced the Safe Schools Act last week to allow the $150 billion of available COVID funds to be used to secure schools in Kansas and throughout the nation. Congress must act to protect kids and harden schools immediately. While we have yet to see legislative text of the latest gun reform negotiations, I can assure Kansans that I will oppose any final bill that infringes on our Second Amendment rights.

Senator Roger Marshall, (R) Kansas

The bipartisan group of Senators working on the legislation includes 10 Democrats and 10 Republicans. This means similar legislation could have a good chance of mustering 60 votes and beating a filibuster on the Senate floor.

If the plan becomes law, states may lose out on opportunities for more money, if they don’t adopt certain parts of the plan. The plan includes money to incentivize states to pass and implement “red flag” laws, which would allow law enforcement to remove guns from people deemed a threat to themselves or others.

Under the proposal, convicted domestic abusers wouldn’t be able to purchase firearms as well. In Kansas, a similar state law bars people convicted of domestic violence from possessing guns within five years after conviction.

Democrats in the Kansas Legislature have also tried to pass legislation to further enforce this law, which would require domestic abusers to relinquish their guns to law enforcement by court order. While, the bill has not yet made it to the floor, plans to bring it back next year are underway.

SECOND AMENDMENT CHALLENGES

Kansas also has second amendment protections in place, which have been challenged in the past.

The Kansas Second Amendment Protection Act, SAPA, which was enacted in 2013, declared it “unlaw­ful” for “the govern­ment of the United States . . . to enforce or attempt to enforce any act . . . of the govern­ment of the United States upon a fire­arm, a fire­arm access­ory, or ammuni­tion that is owned or manu­fac­tured . . . in the state of Kansas and that remains within [its] borders.”

However, the Act came under scrutiny in 2014, when the government prosecuted two Kansas men, Shane Cox and Jeremy Kettler, for violating the National Firearms Act (NFA) by manufacturing (in Kansas), transferring (in Kansas), and possessing (in Kansas) several unregistered firearms. A jury found them guilty of most, but not all, of the charges.

Cox and Kettler appealed their conviction, challenging the NFA’s constitutionality. They alleged that the statute was an invalid exercise of congressional power and an invasion of the Second Amendment right to bear arms. They also challenged the district court’s ruling that their reliance on SAPA provided no defense to charges that they violated the NFA.

According to an opinion summary, The Tenth Circuit granted Kansas’s request to participate in these appeals as needed to defend the SAPA from a Supremacy Clause challenge. The Tenth Circuit rejected Cox’s and Kettler’s challenges to their convictions, without addressing the SAPA’s constitutionality Federal prosec­utors charged both men with felon­ies. Despite suggested state protections, federal judges ultimately had the final say.

‘COMPREHENSIVE’ BACKGROUND CHECKS

Another part of the new gun agreement at the federal level, includes more review for people under 21 who purchase firearms.

In Kansas, gun reform activists have criticized lawmakers for the state’s generally loose policies. Last year, lawmakers passed a bill lowering the concealed carry age to 18, and expands recognition of other state’s concealed carry permits. Minors in the state can also buy guns with barrels longer than 12 inches.

There’s also no set waiting period in Kansas, after purchasing a firearm and completing a background check. In 2019, a bill that was geared toward implementing a three-day waiting period, died in committee.

The new deal in the U.S. Senate aims to strengthen and provide “comprehensive” background checks. It would allow access to juvenile criminal and mental health records on background checks for people under 21. It’s still unclear how the bill will fare on the House side.

The U.S. House passed a sweeping gun control package last week, largely in party-line votes. However, the new Senate deal is aimed at focusing on changes that both sides of the aisle can agree on.

Kansas U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids, echoed calls for action on Capitol Hill, in a statement to Kansas Capitol Bureau on Monday.

“No one should be afraid to send their kids to school, or go to the grocery store or take their family to church. We have seen broad bipartisan support in the past for stronger background checks and red flag laws that keep weapons out of the hands of people who are a danger to themselves and others. I am glad to see the Senate starting from that common ground and will continue to support efforts to get something done because ending the fear and violence, protecting our children—these are not partisan issues.”

Rep. Sharice Davids, (D) Kansas

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Emerson College poll: Greitens favored in Missouri senate race

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — There are less than two months until the Missouri primary as Republicans try to figure out who will run to replace retiring U.S. Senator Roy Blunt.

An exclusive FOX4 poll done in conjunction with Emerson College and “The Hill” shows Eric Greitens in the lead for the Republican nomination.

Greitens, the state’s former governor, leads the poll beyond the margin of error of 3%.

The poll of 1,000 likely Republican primary voters was conducted last weekend, with 26% of voters saying they plan on voting for Greitens. He holds a 6-point lead over Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt and a 10-point lead over Fourth District Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler.

Seventh District Congressman Billy Long is in fourth place with 8%, and political outsider Mark McCloskey garnered just under 4%.

“It’s him (Greitens) or Schmitt it seems like at this point. Hartzler does have that support among women and some more statewide name recognition than say her colleague Billy Long, so I would say that it’s a bit of a three-way race at this point because you do have some time between now and the primary day,” Camille Mumford, communications director at Emerson College Polling, said.

She said Greitens has a 25% “very favorable” view, but also a 26% “very unfavorable” view. Greitens was accused of blackmail and sexual assault, which led to his resignation as governor in 2018.

Despite that, his favorability is 10 points higher among women than men. This poll shows 27% of women support him, Hartzler comes in second at 18%. Greitens holds 24% of men supporting him, only trailing Schmitt at 25%.

In total, Mumford said this may be Greitens race to lose, but there are other things to keep in mind.

While 55% of respondents said their vote will go to the candidate they picked in the poll, 45% said they could change their mind.

“Within that, a stronger majority of people who support Greitens and Hartzler are sticking with their candidate compared to Schmitt supporters, which it’s still a majority,” Mumford said.

“It is still 55% of folks who say they’ll definitely support him in the primary election and won’t change their mind. However, it does seem like his support is a bit softer than Greitens and Hartzler voters.”

There is a Trump card that quite literally could play into this race. We asked this question: If former President Donald Trump endorsed a candidate, would that make you more or less likely to vote for that candidate?

Given that scenario, 49% said they’d be more likely to vote for the candidate he endorses, 41% said it’d make no difference and 10% said they’d be less likely to vote for the candidate Trump chooses.

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Newcomer to the political arena visits Galena Days

GALENA, Kans. — A Republican candidate for Kansas Attorney General was part of the Galena Days fun, during the festival’s opening night (6/2).

Tony Mattivi, a former federal prosecutor, made a stop in the small southeast Kansas town to introduce himself to the public, as well as answer questions from voters.

Mattivi said he’s a political outsider, and his current bid for Kansas Attorney General is the first time running for political office in his life.

Tony Mattivi, Republican candidate for Kansas Attorney General, is wearing a red polo shirt with his campaign logo embroidered on the front.

Tonight’s stop in Galena was one of several that Mattivi will make across Kansas in the coming days.

“It’s a small town, but small towns are an important part of the fabric of our state, right? I know this is not where the majority of the votes come from, but I want people here to understand that their communities are vitally important to me as a candidate.”

Tony Mattivi, Republican Candidate for Kansas Attorney General

Mattivi will face Republicans Kris Kobach and Kellie Warren in the August 3rd primary election.

For more information on Mattivi’s campaign, check out his website, HERE.

You’ll find Tony Mattivi’s campaign page on Facebook, which can be easily accessed HERE.

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Oklahoma governor signs law banning abortion at conception, becomes strictest in the US

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill into law Wednesday that bans abortion at conception in his state, the strictest anti-abortion law in the nation.

Stitt signed House Bill 4327, which prohibits physicians from performing abortions at any point in a pregnancy, unless it is necessary to save the pregnant woman’s life.

The new law immediately went into effect after Stitt signed it.

“I promised Oklahomans that as governor I would sign every piece of pro-life legislation that came across my desk and I am proud to keep that promise today. From the moment life begins at conception is when we have a responsibility as human beings to do everything we can to protect that baby’s life and the life of the mother. That is what I believe and that is what the majority of Oklahomans believe. If other states want to pass different laws, that is their right, but in Oklahoma we will always stand up for life.”

Gov. Kevin Stitt

The law also includes an exemption if the pregnancy is the result of rape, sexual assault or incest that has been reported to law enforcement.

Private citizens, under the new law, can file civil lawsuits up to $10,000 against anyone who performs or assists in performing an abortion. However, it does not allow the woman seeking an abortion to be sued.

“There can be no higher cause for you and I to address in this body, Madam Speaker, than the protection of innocent unborn life,” said Rep. Jim Olsen, R-Roland, said last week as lawmakers debated the legislation before it passed in the House on a 73-16 vote.

Opponents sounded off as well, pointing out what they described as an inconsistent message when it comes to valuing life.

“If you’re preborn, you’re all good,” Rep. Mickey Dollens, D-Oklahoma City, said. “If you’re pre-K, good freaking luck if you’re born in Oklahoma. Good luck with an underfunded foster care system born into underfunded school system.”

The Oklahoma Legislature passed several anti-abortion bills this legislative session

Stitt signed Senate Bill 612 into law earlier this year, and Senate Bill 1503 into law earlier this month.

SB 612 makes it a felony for doctors to perform abortions. Doctors who perform abortions face up to 10 years in prison and up to $100,000 in fines. It goes into effect in late August.

SB 1503, also known as the Oklahoma Heartbeat Act, is a Texas-style anti-abortion law that opens up physicians to civil lawsuits if they perform abortions after cardiac activity can be detected in an embryo – around six weeks of pregnancy. It immediately went into effect after Stitt signed it.

Pro-choice opponents of the Oklahoma Heartbeat Act have tried to prevent the law from going into effect, but the Oklahoma State Supreme Court said no to an injunction while waiting to hear suits filed against the law.