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Columbus residents vote to renew a sales tax

COLUMBUS, Kan. – Voters in Columbus, Kansas decide to renew a half-cent sales tax.

It helps fund emergency services, water and sewer drainage and other things.

>> Previous Article: Special election in Columbus for renewing sales tax

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Unique therapy offers learning experience for veterans

CARTHAGE, Mo. – A Missouri organization is giving some veterans a unique opportunity when it comes to therapy.

Operation Risen Ranch gives veterans the opportunity to work with adult horses.

During a series of meetings, participants will learn the ins and outs of the following:

  • Horse Showing
  • Grooming
  • Riding

Experience is not a requirement for the class, as horses were trained to be around humans.

After a series of lessons, class participants put all their knowledge and training to put their skills to the test in November.

For those interested in signing up, click here.

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Missouri Election Poll: Approval ratings of election officials

KOAM is partnering with Gray TV in Missouri for a series of polls on a variety of topics ahead of the primary elections. The partnership gives KOAM the rights to exclusively share the poll results with viewers in our local 4-State market.

We’ll have more poll results leading up to the election. You can find a link to them at KOAMNewsNow.com/elections.

Today’s survey looks at the approval ratings of those in office and the elections ahead. You can watch the video about the results below and find the full results in the PDF at the bottom of the article. Or, click here.

ABOUT THE POLL / FILTERING

SurveyUSA interviewed 2,175 Missouri adults online from May 11, 2022, through May 15, 2022. They used a sample provided by Lucid Holdings LLC of New Orleans. Of the adults, 1,782 were identified as being registered to vote. The pool of adult survey respondents was weighted to US Census targets for gender, age, race, education, and home ownership.

Presidential Election

In November 2020, Missouri voters gave the nod to Republican Donald Trump over Democrat Joe Biden by a 15-point margin, 56.8% for Trump, 41.4% for Biden. Today, SurveyUSA finds Missouri voters ready to do – exactly – the same thing again, voting for Donald J. Trump by a 15-point margin, 50% to 35%, with 15% undecided. Few are switching horses, and those who are offset one another: 3% of those who voted for Trump last time say they would vote for Biden this time; 5% of those who voted for Biden in 2020 say they’d vote for Trump in 2024.

Watch

Full results

Missouri Election Poll Approval ratings of election officials

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Missouri Election Poll: Education, recreational marijuana, law enforcement

MISSOURI ELECTION PRIMARY POLL

KOAM is partnering with Gray TV in Missouri for a series of polls on a variety of topics ahead of the primary elections. The partnership gives KOAM the rights to exclusively share the poll results with viewers in our local 4-State market.

We’ll have more poll results leading up to the election. You can find a link to them at KOAMNewsNow.com/elections.

Today’s topics are marijuana, education and law enforcement. You can watch videos about the results below and find the full results in the PDF at the bottom of the article. Or, click here.

ABOUT THE POLL / FILTERING

SurveyUSA interviewed 2,175 Missouri adults online from May 11, 2022, through May 15, 2022. They used a sample provided by Lucid Holdings LLC of New Orleans. Of the adults, 1,782 were identified as being registered to vote. The pool of adult survey respondents was weighted to US Census targets for gender, age, race, education, and home ownership.

Education

Close to 2,200 adults were asked three questions about education in Missouri.

Do you think public schools in Missouri are overfunded, adequately funded or underfunded?

  • 60% of total respondents picked “underfunded”
  • 21% said “adequately funded”
  • 13% chose “not sure”
  • 6% picked “overfunded”

The majority of adults surveyed believe teachers are underpaid.

Does the state provide a sound, basic education for every child?

  • 44% say no
  • 34% say yes
  • 22% say they’re not sure

Marijuana

Close to 1,800 registered voters were asked about the recreational use of marijuana.

Should the use of marijuana for recreational use remain against the law in Missouri, or be legalized?

  • 62% say it should be legalized
  • 25% say it should remain against the law

71% of respondents ages 18-34 *and* 35-49 chose legalized. That’s compared to 59% of respondents agest 50-64 *and* 46% of respondents ages 65 and older.

Law Enforcement

Nearly 2,200 adults in Missouri were asked “Does law enforcement need more funding than it now receives? The same amount of funding it now receives? Or less funding than it now receives?”

  • 53% say more funding
  • 21% chose the same amount
  • 14% say less funding
  • 16% picked “not sure”

Read more details about how respondents answered the survey in the PDF below.

Missouri Election Poll Education, recreational marijuana, law enforcement

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Missouri Election Poll: Abortion, economy, War in Ukraine…

KOAM is partnering with other TV stations in Missouri that are owned by Gray Television for a series of polls on a variety of topics. The partnership gives KOAM the rights to exclusively share the poll results with viewers in our local 4-State market.

We’ll have more poll results leading up to the election. You can find a link to them at KOAMNewsNow.com/elections.

Today’s Topics include abortion, economy, covid and Russia

Below are some of the highlights from the survey. You can watch KOAM Jordan Aubey’s report and also read numbers pulled from the survey. The full results of the survey are in a PDF at the bottom of this article.

ABOUT THE POLL / FILTERING

SurveyUSA interviewed 2,175 Missouri adults online from May 11, 2022, through May 15, 2022. They used sample provided by Lucid Holdings LLC of New Orleans.

Of the adults, 1,782 were identified as being registered to vote. The pool of adult survey respondents was weighted to US Census targets for gender, age, race, education, and home ownership.

Economy

  • Economically, 45% of Missouri adults say their family is financially worse off than it was before the pandemic; 10% say they’re better off now. 41% say they’re doing about the same.
  • 45% say President Joe Biden is most to blame for inflation; 20% lay the blame on corporations focused on their profits. 8% think Republicans in Congress deserve most of the blame.

Pandemic Impact

  • Most say life has returned to normal from the pandemic – at least to an extent. 24% say life is back to normal; 45% say it’s somewhat back to normal. 28% say it is not.

War in Ukraine

  • On the War in Ukraine, 37% approve of the way President Biden is handling the US response to the war (14% strongly approve, 23% somewhat approve); 50% disapprove (20% somewhat disapprove, 30% strongly disapprove.)
  • 51% say if Russia attacks a NATO country, US troops should be sent in to defend that country. 20% say US troops should not be sent. 29% aren’t sure.
  • 70% are worried (27% very worried, 43% somewhat worried) that the Russia-Ukraine war could escalate into World War III; 17% are not very worried, 5% not worried at all.

Abortion and Roe v. Wade

  • On the topic of abortion, 48% of Missourians say at least some abortions should be permitted, 46% say very few or none should be allowed:
    • 26% say abortion should always be legally permitted
    • 22% say it should be legal with some restrictions
    • 29% say abortion should be illegal, except in cases of rape, of incest, or to save the mother’s life
    • Just 13% say abortion should always be illegal – something a Missouri law is set to automatically enact should Roe v. Wade be overturned.
  • 47% say Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 US Supreme Court case that legalized abortion nationwide, should remain the law of the land. 31% say Roe v. Wade should be overturned.
  • Should Roe be overturned, a majority of Missouri adults – 58% – are opposed to an existing Missouri law that would automatically go into effect and ban all abortions, including in cases of rape and incest – as just noted, a position only 13% of Missourians agree with. 23% support the law going into effect

You can find the full results in the PDF below, or click here. It’s best viewed in landscape.

Survey USA Election Poll – Missouri Election- Abortion, economy, War in Ukraine…

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Newton County candidates host event prior to elections

NEWTON COUNTY – People in Newton County had the chance to get to know candidates in some upcoming elections.

According to organizers, the event was sponsored by the Newton County Republican Central Committee.

The upcoming elections include Newton County Presiding Commissioner, Newton County Auditor, 7th District US Congressman, and Missouri State Auditor.

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Missouri Election Poll: Candidates, voting trust and more

MISSOURI ELECTION PRIMARY POLL

KOAM is partnering with Gray TV in Missouri for a series of polls on a variety of topics ahead of the primary elections. The partnership gives KOAM the rights to exclusively share the poll results with viewers in our local 4-State market. You can find the results of each poll as we move forward below.

You can click on each data graphic to open it in its own window.

We’ll have more poll results leading up to the election. You can find a link to them at KOAMNewsNow.com/elections.

ABOUT THE POLL / FILTERING

SurveyUSA interviewed 2,175 Missouri adults online from May 11, 2022, through May 15, 2022. They used sample provided by Lucid Holdings LLC of New Orleans.

Of the adults, 1,782 were identified as being registered to vote.

Of the registered voters:

  • 642 were determined by SurveyUSA to be likely to vote in the August 2, 2022 Republican primary,
  • 500 were determined to be likely to vote in the August 2, 2022 Democratic primary,
  • 1,412 were determined to be likely to vote in the November 8 general election

The pool of adult survey respondents was weighted to US Census targets for gender, age, race, education, and home ownership.


QUESTION 1: ARE YOU REGISTERED TO VOTE IN THE STATE OF MISSOURI?

(You can click on each image below to open them)


QUESTION 2: MISSOURI WILL HOLD A PRIMARY ELECTION FOR UNITED STATES SENATE IN AUGUST. NOT EVERYONE MAKES THE TIME TO VOTE IN A PRIMARY. WOULD YOU SAY YOU ARE…?


QUESTION 3: WILL YOU VOTE IN THE REPUBLICAN PRIMARY? OR THE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY?


QUESTION 4: IF YOU WERE FILLING OUT YOUR BALLOT IN THE REPUBLICAN PRIMARY FOR UNITED STATES SENATE TODAY, WHO WOULD YOU VOTE FOR?

Greitens today takes 26% of the vote; incumbent Attorney General Eric Schmitt is at 17%; incumbent US Representative Vicky Hartzler is at 11%. Another current US Representative, Billy Long, takes 7% of the vote today; each of the other 16 candidates on the ballot is at 2% or less, with 28% of likely voters undecided.

Greitens draws significant strength in Southeastern Missouri, where he takes 46% of the vote, more than 4:1 ahead of Schmitt; among “very conservative” voters, where he polls at 38%, compared to 14% for Schmitt; among voters who say the endorsement of former President Trump makes them more likely to vote for a candidate (34%); among the 21% of likely Republican primary voters who say abortion should be illegal under all circumstances (31%); and among men, among those with lower household incomes, and in rural portions of Missouri, each of which give Greitens 30% of the vote. Among those likely voters who tell SurveyUSA they are “certain” to vote in the Republican primary, Greitens leads Schmitt by 13 points, and leads Hartzler by 16 points; among those who say they will “probably” vote, Greitens and Schmitt tie with 18% for each, 11 points ahead of Hartzler.

Schmitt does better among voters who say Donald Trump’s endorsement makes no difference to them, where he takes 25% of the vote; among those who say abortion should be legal with some restrictions (25%); and in suburban parts of the state (24%). Schmitt and Greitens are tied in greater St. Louis.

Hartzler, at 11% overall, takes 23% of the vote in Northern Missouri, just behind Greitens at 29%. Hartzler is also strong among the 15% of likely Republican primary voters who consider themselves to be politically independent, where she takes 19% of the vote, effectively even with Greitens at 20%.

Long significantly outpolls his overall average of 7% only in Southwestern Missouri, where the 7th Congressional District is based; Long has represented the 7th district since 2011.


QUESTION 5: DOES THE ENDORSEMENT OF A CANDIDATE BY FORMER PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP MAKE YOU MORE LIKELY TO VOTE FOR THE ENDORSED CANDIDATE? LESS LIKELY TO VOTE FOR THE ENDORSED CANDIDATE? OR MAKES NO DIFFERENCE EITHER WAY


QUESTION 6: IF YOU WERE FILLING OUT YOUR BALLOT IN THE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY FOR UNITED STATES SENATE TODAY, WHO WOULD YOU VOTE FOR?

In the Democratic Primary for US Senate, Marine veteran and attorney Lucas Kunce takes 10% of the vote today; registered nurse and philanthropist Trudy Busch Valentine is at 8%; 9 other candidates each take 3% or less of the vote. 63% of likely voters are undecided; an undecided vote that large typically signifies that voters are not focused on this contest, and that many of those who today say they are certain to vote in the primary are doing so with a focus on other, more local contests on the ballot.

The contest should be characterized as even at this point; each candidate has advantages. Kunce leads Valentine by 11 points among voters who describe themselves as “very liberal,” by 8 points in Greater Kansas City, and by 7 in rural Missouri. Valentine leads by 6 points among the 15% of likely Democratic primary voters who describe themselves as political independents, by 3 points in greater St. Louis, and by a nominal 2 points in Southwestern Missouri. Businessman Spencer Toder, at 3% overall, has 10%, leading the field, among the 1 in 10 Democratic primary voters who say they are conservatives.

Kunce leads Valentine by 5 points among those who say they are certain to vote in the Democratic primary; Valentine leads by 7 among those who say they will probably vote. Among men, Valentine leads by 3; among women, Kunce leads by 6 – a 9-point gender gap. Kunce leads Valentine by 5 points among voters over age 65, typically the most reliable; the race is tied among Kunce, Valentine, and Toder with the youngest voters, typically the least reliable.


QUESTION 7: HOW MUCH CONFIDENCE DO YOU HAVE THAT VOTES CAST IN THE PRIMARY ELECTION FOR UNITED STATES SENATE WILL BE COUNTED ACCURATELY?

Registered voters are, by and large, confident that votes in the August primary will be counted accurately. 70% of registered voters are confident votes will be counted accurately (34% have confidence, 36% have some confidence); 24% are not confident (17% have little confidence, 7% have none.) 57% of Democrats say they have full confidence, compared to 30% of independents and 22% of Republicans; 32% of Republicans and 29% of independents have little or no confidence, compared with 9% of Democrats.


QUESTION 8:

Thinking ahead to the fall now … Missouri will hold a general election for United States Senate and for other contests in November. Not everyone makes the time to vote in every election. Which best describes you? Are you … certain to vote in the November election this year? Will you probably vote? Are the chances you will vote about 50/50? Or will you probably not vote?

1,782 Registered Voters answered this question.

Looking ahead to the November general election for United States Senate, SurveyUSA asked likely November voters how they would vote in hypothetical matchups between the leading Republican and Democratic candidates. Republicans lead in each of the six potential races. Should Trudy Busch Valentine be the Democratic nominee …

  • Eric Schmitt defeats Valentine by 13 points, 47% to 34%, with 19% undecided.
  • Vicky Hartzler defeats Valentine by 11 points, 44% to 33%; 23% are undecided.
  • Eric Greitens leads Valentine by 6 points, 43% to 37%, with 20% undecided.

If Lucas Kunce is the nominee, a similar tale:

  • Eric Schmitt defeats Kunce by 12 points, 46% to 34%, with 19% undecided.
  • Vicky Hartzler defeats Kunce by 14 points, 45% to 31%; 24% are undecided.
  • Eric Greitens leads Kunce by 6 points, 42% to 36%, with 22% undecided.

Greitens consistently underperforms Schmitt and Hartzler among three groups:

  • Among those with household incomes more than $80K a year, 30% of the November electorate, Greitens polls an average of 16 points behind his GOP rivals. Hartzler and Schmitt lead by an average of 7.5 percentage points among these upper-income voters; Greitens trails by an average of 8.5%.
  • Among the 23% of November voters who identify as political independents, Greitens polls an average of 13 points behind Hartzler and Schmitt, who lead among independents by an average of 8.5 points; Greitens loses independents by an average of 4.5 points.
  • Among those who identify not as “very conservative,” where Greitens runs only 3 points behind Hartzler and Schmitt on average, but who identify as “conservative” – 27% of the electorate – Greitens runs 11 points behind his rivals. Greitens easily defeats either Kunce or Valentine among conservative voters, of course – but by an average of 54 points, as opposed to 65 points on average for Hartzler and Schmitt.

MORE POLL QUESTIONS

You can find more poll results in the PDF below. If it’s not loading for you, you can also click here.

SurveyUSA Election Poll Questions 9-14

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Oklahoma governor signs ban on nonbinary birth certificates

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill Tuesday explicitly prohibiting the use of nonbinary gender markers on state birth certificates, a ban experts say is the first of its kind in the nation.

The bill followed a flap last year over the Oklahoma State Department of Health’s agreement in a civil case allowing a nonbinary option. The birth certificate in that case was issued to an Oklahoma-born Oregon resident who sued after the agency initially refused the request. People who are nonbinary do not identify with traditional male or female gender assignments.

News of the settlement prompted outrage among Republicans, including Stitt, and his appointee to lead the agency abruptly resigned the next day. Stitt then promptly issued an executive order prohibiting any changes to a person’s gender on birth certificates, despite the settlement agreement. A civil rights group has challenged the executive order in federal court, but the state has not yet responded.

Many states only offer male or female gender options on birth certificates, but Oklahoma is the first to write the nonbinary prohibition into law, according Lambda Legal, the civil rights group suing Oklahoma.

Currently, 15 states and the District of Columbia specifically allow a gender marker designation outside of male or female, according to the National Center for Transgender Equality. That number will increase on July 1 when Vermont’s new statute goes into effect.

“People are free to believe whatever they want about their identity, but science has determined people are either biologically male or female at birth,” said Oklahoma Rep. Sheila Dills, the House sponsor of the bill, in a statement. “We want clarity and truth on official state documents. Information should be based on established medical fact and not an ever-changing social dialogue.”

Oklahomans in 2020 elected the nation’s first openly nonbinary legislator in the country, Oklahoma City Democrat Rep. Mauree Turner, who said it was painful to have colleagues single out those who are gender diverse.

“I find it a very extreme and grotesque use of power in this body to write this law and try to pass it – when literally none of them live like us,” Turner tweeted the day the bill was debated.

Republicans in Oklahoma introduced several bills this year targeting transgender and nonbinary people. The governor earlier this year signed a bill prohibiting transgender girls from playing on female sports teams.

The U.S. State Department recently announced it had issued its first passport with an “X” gender designation, marking a milestone in the recognition of the rights of people who do not identify as male or female, and expects to be able to offer the option more broadly next year.

Doctors and scientists say sex and gender are not the same thing. While sex typically refers to anatomy, gender identity is more an inner sense of being male, female or somewhere in between, regardless of physical anatomy, according to Dr. Jason Rafferty, a pediatrician and child psychiatrist at Hasbro Children’s Hospital in Rhode Island and a lead author of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ transgender policy.

Oklahoma SB1100 Signed into Law

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“Axe the Food Tax” effort in Kansas voted down

Kansas’ food sales tax rate is 6.5%, the second-highest rate in the country. It is also one of seven states that fully tax groceries.

Recently, state officials kicked off a push for their latest bill to cut those taxes. Under the “Axe the Food Tax” Plan, state food sales tax would be zero, which could mean more savings for Kansas families.

Today, KOAM Reporter Bronte Sorotsky is speaking with Thrive Allen County and the owner of The Marmaton Market. The discussion: how a food tax cut could impact local residents.

You can catch the story tonight on KOAM News at 5:00 and 6:00 pm.

IOLA, Kan.–Kansas has the second-highest food sales tax rate in the country at 6.5%. Kansas officials are trying to cut some of those taxes, known as the “Axe the food tax” plan.

“And when we look across it different policies in our community, we see that the sales tax is something that negatively impacts our residents and it also impacts our local grocery stores, ” said Thrive Allen County President and CEO Lisse Regehr.

Thrive Allen County is a non-profit, focused on the health and wellness, of the community. The organization works with families in need of financial assistance, the money that would be saved from the loss of the sales tax could be huge.

“In Southeast Kansas, we are a more depressed area. our wages are lower…it can mean more nutritious food that can be purchased at our grocery stores. it means possibly being able to better pay rent and utilities,” Regehr said. 

On Tuesday, the legislation was voted down, those in opposition say they worry about state spending.

“I know there are people who will look at this and say, if you’re cutting the sales tax, that means that there is a lack of funding going into the state. but currently, the state has a surplus,” Regehr said. 

The state projects Kansas could collect a surplus for the upcoming fiscal year. 

Marilyn Logan is the general manager of Marmaton Market in Moran. Kansas, and says the current sales tax in the state impacts not only the store but customers as well. 

“Our sales tax is exorbitant on food, and there’s no reason for it to be that high. The majority of the people in my shop at my store are middle or lower-income. So they don’t have a lot of disposable dollars to spend on food,” Logan said.

And rising costs don’t help.

“We had to explore alternatives because the main supplier that we were used to using did not have the product. and we’re still two and a half years later in that very same situation, I placed an order with my main supplier. I get maybe half of what I order. Prices go up every week,” said Logan.

State Democratic leaders say they hope to continue to try and drop the state’s grocery sales tax.

Previous Article

STATES WITH GROCERY SALES TAX

Kansas is one of a few states in the nation that fully taxes groceries.

According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

  • Arkansas, Illinois, Missouri, Tennesse, Utah and Virginia tax groceries at lower rates than other goods.
  • Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas and Oklahoma tax groceries at the regular sales tax rate.
  • Alabama, Mississippi and South Dakota apply their sales tax fully to food purchased for home consumption.
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Missouri House pitches using budget surplus for tax breaks